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High Temperatures in the Forecast: Tips to Stay Healthy and Safe (7/22/2016)

Door County Public Health Department News Release

High Temperatures in the Forecast: Tips to Stay Healthy and Safe

Temperatures are expected to be in the mid-90s, with heat indices ranging from 95-108 degrees around the state.

NEVER LEAVE CHILDREN OR PETS IN A PARKED VEHICLE: The temperature can rise to 135 degrees in less than 5 minutes, which can cause death to children or pets.

MAKE SURE YOU DRINK PLENTY OF FLUIDS: The replacement of fluids during the summer is essential for good health.

GARDEN HOSES: Water sitting in a garden hose that's exposed to summer sun can reach up to 190 degrees. Children are particularly vulnerable because they tend to be outside and playing with water and hoses, plus their skin is thinner than that of adults so their burns are deeper. Second- and third-degree burns caused by scalding water from outdoor hoses are common when temperatures rise above 100 degrees.

THE PAVEMENT IS EXTREMELY HOT:  It gets hot enough to cause second or third degree burns.  Do not sit or lie on the pavement when hot.  Do not try to walk with bare feet.  This includes animals, their paws can easily get burned, and precautions need to be taken if pets are taken outdoors.

METAL SURFACES CAN GET HOT enough to cause burns which includes door handles or seat belt buckles vehicles (inside and out). Anything left out in direct sunlight will get extremely hot which can cause serious burns.

MAKE SURE YOUR SKIN IS COVERED OR USE SUN BLOCK: Excessive exposure to the sun has been linked to skin cancer. You can also suffer sunburn from exposure to the sun.

TAKE FREQUENT BREAKS IN A COOL PLACE IF YOU HAVE TO WORK OUTSIDE. WEAR LIGHT CLOTHING.

HIGH HEAT CAN CAUSE:

A. Dehydration –The first indicator is being thirsty or having a dry mouth. You should replace fluids as quickly as possible.

B. Heat Exhaustion – Symptoms include heavy sweating, paleness, muscle cramps, weakness, dizziness, headache, nausea, fainting. Solution: Cool down, seek medical attention.

C. Heat Stroke – This is a medical emergency. Symptoms include extremely high body temperature, red, hot, dry skin, rapid pulse, throbbing headache, dizziness, nausea, confusion, and/or unconsciousness. Solution: Call 911 and cool the victim with shower or hose until help arrives.

For more info, go to http://readywisconsin.wi.gov/heat/default.asp

MAKE SURE TO CHECK ON THE ELDERLY DURING PERIODS OF EXCESSIVE HEAT. REMEMBER THAT PETS ALSO SUFFER DUE TO THE HEAT.

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